Tag Archives: fechten

Schläger Mensur; Germany, c. 1910-30

Rare snapshot of a Schläger Mensur

 

 

Rare snapshot of a Schläger Mensur

 

 

Most 19th- and early 20th-century photographs of Mensuren are staged. This one isn’t…

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Épée Fencer; France, c. 1900

 

Ready for bouting

Ready for bouting

Young French fencer…

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Foil Fencers; Germany, c. 1920

 

The Roaring Twenties

The Roaring Twenties

Female foil fencing phalanx…

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Foil Fencing; USA, c. 1930

 

A perfect lunge

A perfect lunge

Perfect form in foil fencing…

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Foil master; France, c. 1870

 

Napoleon III inspired the facial hair

Napoleon III inspired the facial hair

A French master of the foil…

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Mensursäbel; Germany; c. 1900

 

The Elvis Presley of dueling weapons

The Elvis Presley of dueling weapons

Who wouldn’t want to show up for a saber Mensur wielding a black-velvet weapon…

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Saber fencer; Germany; c. 1880

Mit Binden und Bandagen

Mit Binden und Bandagen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready for the Säbelmensur…

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Kurze Geschichte Des Akademischen Fechtens In Deutschland; Teil 2: Die Turner

Der Einfluß der Jahn’schen Turnerbewegung auf das Deutsche Hiebfechten…

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Fencing at the Ritterakademie Liegnitz; Germany, 1743

 

Fencing at the Ritterakademie Liegnitz

Fencing at the Ritterakademie Liegnitz

 

 

 

The education of young German noblemen included fencing as well as “vaulting” (Voltigieren) on the pommel horse.

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Behind the woodshed: Little-known aspects of Dussack play through the ages

They called it a Dussack, Dusack, Dysack, Tesak, Tuseckn, Thuseckn, Disackn, or Dusägge. And judging from the rather pedestrian taunting rhymes that the staunch craftsmen and artisans of the German fighting guilds made up, it appears that its use was at least as popular as its orthographic variety is mystifying: Some of the 16th-century Fechtschulrheime show that during some 16th-century Fechtschulen, over two thirds of all bouts were fought with the Dussack, by far outstripping those conducted with long swords, staves, and dagger.

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