Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Day After: Alchemical reactions to FencingClassics’ April Fool’s prank

17634440_1431654203575938_1452753201947942708_n“I Laughed. I Cried. It moved me, Bob.”

We conclude our 2017 April Fool’s prank with a cursory glance at the reactions of those who caught on early, those who read along in puzzlement, and those who gave full vent to their feelings of entitlement and resentment.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Alchemia Dimicandi: Some observations on language and possible date of origin

smallsword rostock 2As indicated earlier, we are preparing a recently rediscovered short text for publication:

The Alchemia Dimicandi is a problematic document, both in regard to provenance and chronology of creation. The following provides an attempt at dating its origin.

Continue reading

Old School: Four Kreußlerian Foils

kr3From the late 1600’s until the first decade of the 20th century, the Kreußler method of thrust fencing dominated the use of the foil and “Rappier”. Here are four representative varieties of the weapons used…

Continue reading

More swords looking for a home…

swordsThere’s more swords on the block over at SwordExchange.com. Continue reading

Where to get your daily dose of iron…

schlager1.jpg

FencingClassics has established a collector-to-collector forum where fencing and HEMA enthusiasts can not only list weapons and books for sale, but will create an ongoing record of weapon dimensions, weight, length, balance points and price levels…

Continue reading

Just put it on Craig’s List: Hastings Sword doesn’t sell!

_76214770_swordcompPity the fools!

The BBC writes: “A medieval sword possibly taken as a trophy during the Battle of Hastings has failed to sell at auction. The “extremely rare” broadsword belonged to Humphrey De Bohun, a kinsman of William The Conqueror.

Sir Humphrey fought at Hastings in 1066, where Christie’s auctioneers think he could have captured the sword.

It had been hoped the sword would fetch up to £120,000 in the auction house’s Out of the Ordinary sale in South Kensington The weapon has an earlier Viking blade, dating from the mid-11th Century.”

But no—nobody cared!

Continue reading

Fencing as a Language (Imre Vass)

The Fencing Coach

Quarter-finals_Fernandez-Heinzer_Masters_epee_2012_n04 Image from wikimedia.

This excerpt was brought to my attention by reddit user /u/notinsanescientist. It is from Imre Vass’s book Epee Fencing: a Complete System:

“Fencing is like a language. Just like someone trying to listen to a rapid conversation in a foreign tongue, only occasionally can a non-fencer or casual spectator recognize how the individual actions of the fencers are related to one another. And just as, once we grasp the meaning of a sentence, we tend to forget its precise words, so, for the spectator whose eye has registered that a touch has scored, the movements preceding the hit proper tend to dissolve into each other; losing their individual importance. It must be borne in mind, however, that the hit itself is neither more nor less than the period, ending a sentence that has both content and style. The essence and content of fencing are to be found in…

View original post 196 more words

Combative celebrity: The 1796 Rules and Regulations

marchant 1796 Rules and RegulationsLeafing through the most recent issue of the Smithsonian magazine, tellingly titled 101 Objects that Changed America, you can admire Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers, Bell’s telephone, and the titillating  tassels of the Talahassee Tassel Tosser.

(Alright, I made up the last one.)

Unfortunately, no fencer, swordsman, or whatever the appropriate term is that sectarian xiphomachophiliacs apply to their respective niche, made it into the issue. 

Are there artifacts whose provenance can be traced to individual celebrities of bladed combat? Luckily, there are a few things in the Amberger Collection that can make up for that shortcoming… and perhaps, with the help of our readers, we can come up with at least a Dirty Dozen…

Continue reading

Meet J. Christoph Amberger

pic3This site’s editor, J. Christoph Amberger, was born and raised in West Berlin, Germany. He studied in Berlin, Göttingen, Aberdeen, and Annapolis and holds an M.A. in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College Graduate Institute. After Obtaining his J.D. from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 2015 and passing the Maryland bar, he is now an attorney in Baltimore City. Continue reading

Valentine’s Day, Massacred

When I was a young lad in Berlin, we had no such thing. But thanks to the tireless efforts of Nestlé and Fleurop, even my German compatriots are now encouraged to buy candy and flowers, and purchase a sappy, raunchy or—they say—even classy card on Valentine’s Day.

Nothing wrong with that.

So why not throw in a tender yet timeless story about this festive occasion into the FencingClassics mix.

A word of caution: We have no idea where the author got the notion that things can happen that way. He sounds credible.

Happy Valentine’s Day, you crazy kids. Continue reading