Hot off the presses: Codex Amberger

Hidden among the stacks of a New York City book dealer, its existence unknown to even the most erudite scholars, the Codex Amberger was lost to history until its chance discovery in 2005. Originally thought to have been created by Albrecht Dürer, now attributed to the sphere of the Augsburg patrician Paulus Hector Mair, it may have been part of a much larger treatise whose remnants are yet to be found….

Continue reading

Duel Léon Blum vs. Pierre Veber, 1912

It’s been a while, but here’s a new piece on a 1912 French duel with epees de combat.

50 Dueling Swords

“On the dueling grounds, Monsieur Pierre Veber exhibited the most elegant bravery. When he fought with Robert de Flers, I was in directing the fight…”

View original post 1,021 more words

Coming soon! CODEX AMBERGER

codex.jpeg

Continue reading

The Classical Lunge

lunge.jpg

The good Juncker von A. called it “Lanzenstechen auf Schusters Rappen”*: The back leg does not begin to straighten until the arm s fully extended. Since this reduces the tip speed to that of the body, it helps when the opponent (a) doesn’t move and (b) doesn’t attendmpt to parry. But we like the follow-up to the mask, even though it is useless in foil fencing.

  • this idiomatic expression literally translates as “lance-running on shoemaker’s black horse”; shoemaker’s black horse is, of course, a pair of shoes. Pedestrian jousting, in other words.

Saber Fencing at Joinville-le-Pont, 1900-1914

Bsaber1 Continue reading

Quote

Terrain v. Planche: A brief history of late 19th-century fencing spaces

via Terrain v. Planche: A brief history of late 19th-century fencing spaces

Image

swordanimation.gif Continue reading

Duel Boulanger-Floquet, 1888

An American, Chinese and Austrian point of view on a French duel from 1888…

50 Dueling Swords

flo1

View original post 722 more words

Broken water pipe leads to discovery of rusty saber

AR-181018593.jpg&MaxW=505&ImageVersion=default&NCS_modified=20181018091213 Continue reading

Boston Tea and Mad King George: The Six Degrees of Henry Angelo

Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels. But it’s also  one of the great sources of historical irony. The War of 1812 created one such irony, as far as the classical canon of fencing literature is concerned.

This one is quite complex, as indeed anything should be that manages to connect personages as diverse as a prominent member of the Boston Tea Party, Mad King George, the Hessian mercenaries—and the ubiquitous fencing master dynasty of the Angelos in a game that makes the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon look as one-dimensional as a Partridge Family reunion special… Continue reading